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October 25, 2016Volume 12 Issue 40


Image - The aliens have landed. Lock 'em up.
The aliens have landed. Lock 'em up.
It looks “alien,” but it’s the ultimate in box-security fasteners. In fact, the Alien Lock from Micro Plastics is the first and only dedicated box fastener. It is a much less expensive solution than banding or taping your boxes, and it keeps them more secure, too. It’s easy and fast to insert, and it’s incredibly strong. It cannot be pulled out without it being obvious that the box was tampered with -- it must be cut off. This is a 1-step fastener: Push Alien Lock through the lock port, and the locking process is finished.
Click here to learn more.

In this issue of Designfax

  • U.S. Navy electric-propulsion stealth destroyer
  • Welding process joins dissimilar sheets better
  • 3D printing: Simplified multi-material design software
  • Wings: Navy Osprey first 3D-printed parts
  • Mike Likes: 2017 Cool Parts calendar
  • Toolbox: NIST making 'digital thread' accessible
  • Have a photonics problem you can't solve?
  • Stationary field tooth clutch
  • Etched and formed micro metal parts
  • Zero-backlash brake for indexing, positioning
  • Videos+: Technologies and inspiration in action
    • How to make a Li-ion battery in 7 easy steps
    • New generation of Panama Canal locks
  • Most Popular Last Issue
    • New residential water heater concept
    • Robots: Ballbot now has only two moving parts!
    • Hot shot: Army develops non-lethal crowd burner
  • New Products
    • Electrical, Mechanical, Motion
    Cover Image: USS Zumwalt is Navy's largest, most advanced stealth destroyer

News

Georgia Tech study finds 'lurking malice' in cloud hosting services

Airbus standardizes on Stratasys additive manufacturing solutions for A350 XWB aircraft supply chain

Safer rocket motor concept could boost CubeSat missions

NASA pulls together national flight data to sleuth out air traffic improvement mysteries



Image - He’s Alive! How did Dr. Frankenstein do it?
He’s Alive! How did Dr. Frankenstein do it?
Creating life is no easy task, even for Dr. Frankenstein. Before the lifeless amalgamation of human parts can be animated, they must be securely fastened together. Adequate torque must be applied to the Monster’s neck bolts, lest it goes the way of the headless horseman. FUTEK’s TRS series rotary torque sensor and LTH series donut load cell are combined to verify the applied torque and bolt loading is sufficient to securely fasten the Monster’s head.

Check out the entire application!


Feature articles
U.S. Navy commissions electric-propulsion stealth destroyer

The U.S. Navy has commissioned for service the USS Zumwalt, its largest and most advanced stealth destroyer. The 610-ft-long electric “multi-mission” ship can hit a target at a range of more than 60 miles, has a wave-piercing tumblehome design, and features a unique superstructure that makes it less visible to enemy radar.
Read the full article.
Image -
Over 200 man-years of in-house air bearing experience >


Image - New welding process joins dissimilar sheets better
New welding process joins dissimilar sheets better
Scientists at the University of Stuttgart in Germany have developed two new process variants that aim to expand the areas of application for friction stir welding considerably. Thanks to these procedural variants, it is possible, for the first time, to use friction stir welding to join steel and aluminum sheets of different thicknesses economically while ensuring high-strength joints.
Reade the full article.

Image - 3D printing: <br>MIT unveils simplified software for multi-material designs
3D printing:
MIT unveils simplified software for multi-material designs

3D printing has progressed over the last decade to include multi-material fabrication, but it still has been difficult for non-programmers to create objects made of many materials (or mixtures of materials) without a more user-friendly interface. A team from MIT's Computer Science and Artificial Intelligence Laboratory recently unveiled “Foundry,” a system for custom-designing a variety of 3D-printed objects with multiple materials.
Read the full article.

Image - 15,000 Stock Metric Gears
15,000 Stock Metric Gears
KHK USA Inc offers the largest selection of stock metric gears in North America. With over 175 types, in more than 15,000 configurations, KHK USA offers the broadest selection of spur gears, helical gears, internal ring gears, gear racks, bevel gears, worms and wormwheels, and other gear types.

Click here to learn more.


Image - Wings: <br>Navy Osprey marks first flight with 3D-printed, safety-critical parts
Wings:
Navy Osprey marks first flight with 3D-printed, safety-critical parts

Naval Air Systems Command (NAVAIR) at the Naval Air Station in Patuxent River, MD, marked its first successful flight demonstration July 29 of a flight-critical aircraft component built using additive manufacturing (AM) techniques. An MV-22B Osprey completed a test flight outfitted with a titanium, 3D-printed link and fitting assembly for the engine nacelle.
Read the full article.

Image - Mike Likes: 2017 Cool Parts calendar
Mike Likes: 2017 Cool Parts calendar
Request a free 2017 Cool Parts calendar and never miss a project deadline next year. Each month, you’ll be greeted by a new, innovative part made possible by rapid manufacturing processes like 3D printing, CNC machining, and injection molding.
Get your 2017 Proto Labs calendar today.

Image - Engineer's Toolbox: <br>New NIST test bed makes the 'digital thread' accessible
Engineer's Toolbox:
New NIST test bed makes the 'digital thread' accessible

Looking to cut your overall manufacturing time by 25, 50, or even 70 percent? NIST is working on it. Researchers at the National Institute of Standards and Technology have launched the Smart Manufacturing Systems (SMS) Test Bed, an innovative model factory that aims to facilitate the advanced manufacturing technology known as the "digital thread" and helps manufacturers cut costs, shorten production time, reduce errors, and provide higher quality goods. The goal is one model that contains all information to carry it through design, smart manufacturing, and inspection.
Read the full article.

Image - Have a photonics problem you can't solve?
Have a photonics problem you can't solve?
At LumenFlow, we make light do what you want it to. Our team of exceptionally creative engineers and technicians works from our "skunkworks"-like environment, providing 125 years of combined experience on multiple simulation platforms for optics and lighting. Check out our experience in infrared and visible light lenses, component lens elements, laser modules, alignment fixtures, special illumination projects, 360-degree imaging, and more. From optical modeling, design and engineering, and prototype development to assembly, manufacturing, testing, and product qualification, we can handle your most pressing photonics challenges.
Click here to learn more.

Image - Stationary field tooth clutch
Stationary field tooth clutch
SEPAC designed the Stationary Field Tooth Clutch (SFTC Series) to deliver an exceptional torque-to-size ratio with the ability to operate dry or in oil. This model offers a bearing-supported design to ease the installation process. The SFTC’s positive engagement, less than 1 degree of backlash, high torque-to-size ratio, and ease of installation make it a top choice for aerospace and defense actuators, aircraft flight control, military ground systems, weapon systems, elevator/azimuth, robotics, medical equipment/imaging, and more.
Click here to learn more.

Image - Etched and formed micro metal parts
Etched and formed micro metal parts
Tech-Etch combines photochemical etching with precision metal bending to create extremely small formed features in thin metal parts. A staff of talented and creative tool and die makers utilizes state-of-the-art techniques to manufacture tools capable of forming features down to .003 in. in a wide variety of metals. Parts range in thickness from .0005 in. and up. Photo etching produces burr-free parts with intricate and complex shapes. Prototypes can be delivered in five days. Laminating, plating, heat treating, and assembly are available in-house.
Click here to learn more.

Image - Zero-backlash brake for indexing, positioning
Zero-backlash brake for indexing, positioning
The Model I-300 from Nexen Group is a spring-engaged, air-released, power-off brake designed to provide high torque for backlash-free holding and emergency stopping on indexers and positioning systems. The I-300’s high torque and short response time ensure the shortest possible stopping distance. The brake connects to the shaft with tapered, keyless locking devices. It is normally engaged until air pressure is applied to release it. Nexen’s patented braking element locks and holds the shaft in position without any displacement upon engagement or reversing of the load.
Click here to learn more.

Most popular last issue

Image - New residential water heater concept promises high efficiency, lower cost
New residential water heater concept promises high efficiency, lower cost
A team of scientists from the Department of Energy's Oak Ridge National Laboratory and the University of Florida has developed a novel "semi-open" natural gas-fired design that could yield lower-cost, higher-efficiency systems for water heating in residential buildings.
Read the full article.

Image - Robots: Ballbot now has only two moving parts!
Robots: Ballbot now has only two moving parts!
More than a decade ago, Ralph Hollis of Carnegie Mellon University invented the ballbot, an elegantly simple robot whose tall, thin body glides atop a sphere slightly smaller than a bowling ball using multiple motors, rollers, and belts. The latest version, called SIMbot, has a new spherical induction motor design with just one moving part: the ball. The only other active moving part is the body itself. There is no traditional mechanical drive system.
Read the full article.

Image - Hot shot: U.S. Army engineers develop Solid State Active Denial Technology for non-lethal crowd control
Hot shot: U.S. Army engineers develop Solid State Active Denial Technology for non-lethal crowd control
Engineers at Picatinny Arsenal in New Jersey are developing technology for non-lethal crowd control. The Solid State Active Denial Technology (SS-ADT) is a directed-energy weapon that uses radio frequency (RF) millimeter waves at 95 GHz traveling at the speed of light to create a brief, intolerable heating sensation on a person's skin at tactically useful ranges.
Read the full article.

Videos+: Technologies and inspiration in action
How to make a Li-ion battery in 7 easy steps
The Pacific Northwest National Laboratory’s semi-automated Advanced Battery Facility enables scientists to test all kinds of different materials -- including lithium-metal, sulfur, sodium, and magnesium -- to make batteries last longer and store more energy. The tests are helping scientists from national labs, universities, and industry find lower-cost replacements for today’s most common rechargeable battery, the lithium-ion battery. You may be surprised at how they're made.
View the video.

Video Image
New generation of Panama Canal locks
As a project partner for the latest Panama Canal improvements, Bosch Rexroth manufactured, delivered, and installed a total of 152 customized hydraulic power units and drive cylinders, and the redundant PLC control system for the various lock chambers. This solution ensures continuous availability and efficiency, decreasing freshwater consumption nearly 60 percent per lock.
View the video.

Video Image

New products

Electrical/Electronics
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