May 09, 2023 Volume 19 Issue 18

Mechanical News & Products

Designfax weekly eMagazine

Subscribe Today!
image of Designfax newsletter

Archives

View Archives

Partners

Manufacturing Center
Product Spotlight

Modern Applications News
Metalworking Ideas For
Today's Job Shops

Tooling and Production
Strategies for large
metalworking plants

One-part epoxy changes from red to clear under UV

Master Bond UV15RCL is a low-viscosity, cationic-type UV-curing system with a special color-changing feature. The red material changes to clear once exposed to UV light, indicating that there is UV light access across the adhesive material. Although this change in color from red to clear does not indicate a full cure, it does confirm that the UV light has reached the polymer. This epoxy is an excellent electrical insulator. UV15RCL adheres well to metals, glass, ceramics, and many plastics, including acrylics and polycarbonates.
Learn more.


SPIROL Press-N-Lok™ Pin for plastic housings

The Press-N-Lok™ Pin was designed to permanently retain two plastic components to each other. As the pin is inserted, the plastic backfills into the area around the two opposing barbs, resulting in maximum retention. Assembly time is quicker, and it requires lower assembly equipment costs compared to screws and adhesives -- just Press-N-Lok™!
Learn more about the new Press-N-Lok™ Pin.


Why hybrid bearings are becoming the new industry standard

A combination of steel outer and inner rings with ceramic balls or rollers is giving hybrid bearings unique properties, making them suitable for use in a wide range of modern applications. SKF hybrid bearings make use of silicon nitride (twice as hard as bearing steel) rolling elements and are available as ball bearings, cylindrical roller bearings, and in custom designs. From electric erosion prevention to friction reduction and extended maintenance intervals, learn all about next-gen hybrid bearings.
Read the SKF technical article.


3M and Ansys train engineers on simulating adhesives

Ansys and 3M have created an advanced simulation training program enabling engineers to enhance the design and sustainability of their products when using tapes and adhesives as part of the design. Simulation enables engineers to validate engineering decisions when analyzing advanced polymeric materials -- especially when bonding components made of different materials. Understand the behavior of adhesives under real-world conditions for accurate modeling and design.
Read this informative Ansys blog.


New FATH T-slotted rail components in black from AutomationDirect

Automation-Direct has added a wide assortment of black-colored FATH T-slotted hardware components to match their SureFrame black anodized T-slotted rails, including: cube connectors (2D and 3D) and angle connectors, joining plates of many types, brackets, and pivot joints. Also included are foot consoles, linear bearings in silver and black, cam lever brakes, and L-handle brakes. FATH T-slotted hardware components are easy to install, allow for numerous T-slotted structure configurations, and have a 1-year warranty against defects.
Learn more.


Weird stuff: Moon dust simulant for 3D printing

Crafted from a lunar regolith simulant, Basalt Moon Dust Filamet™ (not a typo) available from The Virtual Foundry closely mirrors the makeup of lunar regolith found in mare regions of the Moon. It enables users with standard fused filament fabrication (FFF) 3D printers to print with unparalleled realism. Try out your ideas before you go for that big space contract, or help your kid get an A on that special science project.
Learn more.


Break the mold with custom injection molding by Rogan

With 90 years of industry experience, Rogan Corporation possesses the expertise to deliver custom injection molding solutions that set businesses apart. As a low-cost, high-volume solution, injection molding is the most widely used plastics manufacturing process. Rogan processes include single-shot, two-shot, overmolding, and assembly. Elevate your parts with secondary operations: drilling and tapping, hot stamping, special finishes, punch press, gluing, painting, and more.
Learn more.


World's first current-carrying fastening technology

PEM® eConnect™ current-carrying pins from Penn-Engineering provide superior electrical connections in applications that demand high performance from internal components, such as automotive electronics. This first-to-market tech provides repeatable, consistent electrical joints and superior installation unmatched by traditional fastening methods. Features include quick and secure automated installation, no hot spots or poor conductivity, and captivation options that include self-clinching and broaching styles.
Learn more about eConnect pins.


New interactive digital catalog from EXAIR

EXAIR's latest catalog offers readers an incredible source of innovative solutions for common industrial problems like conveying, cooling, cleaning, blowoff, drying, coating, and static buildup. This fully digital and interactive version of Catalog 35 is designed for easy browsing and added accessibility. Customers can view, download, print, and save either the full catalog or specific pages and sections. EXAIR products are designed to conserve compressed air and increase personnel safety in the process. Loaded with useful information.
Check out EXAIR's online catalog.


5 cost-saving design tips for CNC machining

Make sure your parts meet expectations the first time around. Xometry's director of application engineering, Greg Paulsen, presents five expert tips for cutting costs when designing custom CNC machined parts. This video covers corners and radii, designing for deep pockets, thread depths, thin walls, and more. Always excellent info from Paulsen at Xometry.
View the video.


What can you secure with a retaining ring? 20 examples

From the watch dial on your wrist to a wind turbine, no application is too small or too big for a Smalley retaining ring to secure. Light to heavy-duty loads? Carbon steel to exotic materials? No problem. See how retaining rings are used in slip clutches, bike locks, hip replacements, and even the Louvre Pyramid.
See the Smalley design applications.


Load fasteners with integrated RFID

A crane, rope, or chain may be required when something needs lifting -- plus anchoring points on the load. JW Winco offers a wide range of solutions to fasten the load securely, including: lifting eye bolts and rings (with or without rotation), eye rings with ball bearings, threaded lifting pins, shackles, lifting points for welding, and more. Some, such as the GN 581 Safety Swivel Lifting Eye Bolts, even have integrated RFID tags to clearly identify specific lifting points during wear and safety inspections and manage them digitally and without system interruption.
Learn more.


Couplings solve misalignments more precisely with targeted center designs

ALS Couplings from Miki Pulley feature a simplistic, three-piece construction and are available in three different types for more precisely handling parallel, angular, or axial misalignment applications. The key feature of this coupling design is its center element. Each of the three models has a center member that has a unique and durable material and shape. Also called a "spider," the center is designed to address and resolve the type of misalignment targeted. Ideal for unidirectional continuous movement or rapid bidirectional motion.
Learn more.


What is 3D-MID? Molded parts with integrated electronics from HARTING

3D-MID (three-dimensional mechatronic integrated devices) technology combines electronic and mechanical functionalities into a single, 3D component. It replaces the traditional printed circuit board and opens up many new opportunities. It takes injection-molded parts and uses laser-direct structuring to etch areas of conductor structures, which are filled with a copper plating process to create very precise electronic circuits. HARTING, the technology's developer, says it's "Like a PCB, but 3D." Tons of possibilities.
View the video.


Make nylon 3D-printed prototypes and parts in the office

The new SLS 300 from 3D Systems is an affordable, turnkey, closed-loop 3D-printing system designed to operate in a smaller-footprint environment. SLS 300 makes selective laser sintering available to a broader range of customers with a high-reliability, affordable solution to produce end-use parts. Users can produce tough, durable parts from a range of production-grade nylon materials. Amazing fill, finishing, and clean-up systems.
Learn more.


Researchers create antimicrobial 'superfoam'

A new three-dimensional foam conducts electricity and even cleans polluted water.

A versatile new foam material developed by researchers at the University of Georgia (UGA) could significantly reduce health care-related infections caused by implanted medical devices -- or drastically improve clean-up efforts following environmental disasters like oil spills.

Like a spongy Swiss Army knife, the porous, three-dimensional foam is water repellent, meaning it resists blood, microbes, and proteins, while also exhibiting antimicrobial and oil-water separation properties. Its versatility, functionality, and relatively inexpensive production costs could make it a valuable resource for future clinicians and environmental remediation professionals alike.

"Making a multifunctional and versatile surface is an extremely challenging task," said Hitesh Handa, an associate professor in UGA's School of Chemical, Materials, and Biomedical Engineering. "You can find a surface that is only antimicrobial, or you can find one that can only prevent blood clotting. To be able to fabricate materials that are anticlotting, antimicrobial, and antifouling is a significant improvement on current standards."

The material is a coarse foam with a pair of added fillers: hydrophobic (water-repellent) electrically conductive graphene nanoplatelets and hydrophobic bactericidal copper microparticles. In addition to repelling water, their inclusion created a coarse surface that facilitated high oil adsorption capacity, and the copper, a known toxin to bacterial cells, added antimicrobial properties to the surface itself.

Studies of its effectiveness yielded positive results.

Using E. coli as a test bacterium, researchers found that the material resulted in a 99.9% bacterial reduction over a simple polymer. While that doesn't mean that all bacteria had been removed from the solution, it is a significant improvement that Handa thinks could create better health outcomes for many of the more than 500,000 patients who endure health care-related infections from medical implants each year.

"Current medical devices are prone to contamination," Handa said. "When you put any medical device into the body, proteins are the first thing to stick to a surface, and they act like a glue that allows blood or bacteria to adhere. So, if we can stop the protein adsorption, half the battle is won."

Likewise, a series of tests demonstrated the material's high capacity for separating water and other oil-based pollutants. By placing a 3D sponge made from this surface into a variety of water mixtures -- chloroform, hydrochloric acid, and other organic particles -- researchers were able to show its ability to absorb and remove the organic pollutants from the water, while also killing bacteria in the water itself.

At scale, the material could prove impactful in environmental clean-up efforts from oil spills or other similar scenarios.

The idea follows a phenomenon called the lotus effect, which refers to self-cleaning properties that are a result of ultrahydrophobicity exhibited by the lotus flower. This has long been a model for the fabrication of superhydrophobic surfaces that have proven effective at cleaning, antifogging, and antifouling. Past design strategies, however, have fallen short due to a lack of functionality and scalability.

"The versatility is the key here," said Mark Garren, a co-author on the paper and doctoral student in Handa's lab. "The multifunctional properties are what inspired this, then developing that and showcasing all of its abilities."

Going forward, the primary goal for researchers is to apply the surface to medical devices and demonstrate its effectiveness before moving on to non-human animal trials and, eventually, testing in humans. Facing less rigorous safety standards, the surface may be more readily deployable in the environmental cleanup use cases.

This research, titled "Superhydrophobic and Conductive Foams with Antifouling and Oil-Water Separation Properties" was published in the American Chemical Society's Applied Materials & Interfaces January issue.

Source: University of Georgia

Published May 2023

Rate this article

[Researchers create antimicrobial 'superfoam']

Very interesting, with information I can use
Interesting, with information I may use
Interesting, but not applicable to my operation
Not interesting or inaccurate

E-mail Address (required):

Comments:


Type the number:



Copyright © 2023 by Nelson Publishing, Inc. All rights reserved. Reproduction Prohibited.
View our terms of use and privacy policy