October 21, 2014 Volume 10 Issue 39

Materials News & Products

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Who knew? How colorants affect plastic

In plastic injection molding, one aspect of polymer characteristics that doesn't always get the consideration it deserves is the addition of colorant. Believe it or not, there is a whole scientific body of knowledge about the ways in which adding color to plastic can affect its behavioral properties. This short article by Denny Scher of ICO Mold takes a high-level look at some of the different, and surprising, ways colorants can affect plastics.
Read the full article.


Retaining magnets from JW Winco: Universal and clever

JW Winco has expanded its magnet line to support more applications with new materials, shapes, systems, and even raw magnets. Learn about their latest offerings, including retaining magnets designed for corrosive environments (GN 50.8), encapsulated magnets designed for sensitive or painted surfaces (GN 51.8), handle magnets (GN 53.3), and powerful magnets designed to handle challenging environs (GN 52.6).
Learn more.


3D print tool steel with the ease of a plastic

The Virtual Foundry, a pioneer in advanced 3D-printing materials, is excited to announce the launch of their latest innovation: M300 Tool Steel Filametâ„¢ (not a typo). This material answers the demand for FFF 3D-printable Tool Steel, delivering unparalleled strength and versatility. What sets this material apart is its seamless compatibility with various 3D printers, including Creality, Bambu Lab, Ultimaker, and more. The filament prints effortlessly, resembling the ease of working with PLA (plastic).
Learn more.


Great Resources: Sheet metal design guide

If you're looking for a basic guide to sheet metal design, this one from Xometry will serve your needs well. Follow the design requirements and tolerances in this guide to ensure parts fall closer to design intent. This is the type of information you'll sock away and then refer to again and again.
Read the full article.


Particle foam perfectly distributed thanks to simulation with Ultrasim

BASF's Ultrasim simulation solution now includes Infinergy, an expanded thermoplastic polyurethane (E-TPU) that is used in a wide range of applications to make components with particle foam -- from bicycle tires to the soles on shoes. Identify and solve problems related to pneumatic filling when distributing particle foams in molds, even taking gravity and mold closing into consideration. Avoid those pesky air pockets.
Learn more.


Premium polymer DLP printer is half the price of its predecessor

Desktop Metal has just launched the ETEC Pro XL -- a premium polymer digital light processing (DLP) printer that enters the market at less than half the price as its predecessor. DLP is regarded by many as a superior polymer 3D-printing technology for speed, surface finish, and accuracy. Ideal for automotive and machine parts, aerospace components, housings, connectors, jigs and fixtures, short-run molds, and more.
Read the full article.


CNC machining case study: One-of-a-kind computer chassis

Learn how Josh Sniffen, the YouTuber behind the popular PC-building channel "Not From Concentrate," trusted Xometry to provide a wide range of manufacturing options, personalized Design for Manufacturing (DFM) feedback, and order management support for his latest creation: the HEXO ATX computer chassis. All in all, Sniffen procured parts using Xometry's CNC machining service, selective laser sintering 3D-printing service, and sheet metal cutting and fabrication services. A neat insider look at the process.
Read this Xometry case study.


Which parts should be 3D printed? AI combs through CAD files to find out

One of the biggest challenges in transitioning to additive manufacturing (AM) is the ability to identify which parts are best suited for the process quickly and easily. Learn how Danfoss, Stanley Engineered Fastening, and even the U.S. military have utilized advanced additive manufacturing software to automate the process, reducing material waste and energy costs, improving part reliability, decreasing lead times, as well as now having the ability to identify part consolidation opportunities through intelligent AM decision-making.
Read the full article.


9 key design tips for injection molding

Keep costs down and quality up all while optimizing your injection molded designs with these helpful tips from Xometry. Learn how to build better injection molded parts and products -- using draft angles, ribs and gussets, radii, fillets, and more -- and set expectations for the injection molding process. Good info here.
View the video.


Metal additive manufacturing: Rocket turbopump design

Mixing undergraduate curiosity and real-world engagement, two students from Colorado University Boulder Aerospace Engineering Sciences program, Zachary Lesan and Patrick Watson, started an independent effort on turbopump design and manufacture that is a lesson in determination and industry collaboration. With lots of supplies and advice from industry heavy hitters including Velo3D, CFturbo, SpaceX, and many more, their project has reinforced significant points being made about next-generation rocketry.
Read the full article.


Transparent ceramics for extreme optics

Sapphire is an inherently transparent ceramic material that is resistant to extremes of temperature and environment. Sapphire can be processed to unique and precise shape/form by diamond grinding and polishing to allow full transparency. INSACO is a global leader in this capability -- and working with ultra-hard materials in general.
Learn more.


When metals can't survive: Machined ceramics as an alternative

Technical Ceramics are so hard and wear resistant that they cannot be machined with conventional tools -- but they can outlast and outperform other materials in demanding or harsh applications. Insaco's proprietary diamond grinding process and specialized techniques developed over many decades allow the company to produce and document parts to exacting specifications consistently. Learn all about the alternatives you have when metals just can't take it.
Read this informative Insaco article.


5 biggest 3D-printing misconceptions

3D printing first made its debut in manufacturing over 35 years ago, but there is still a lot to learn about this quickly evolving technology. The engineers at EOS are often met with 3D-printing misconceptions or myths when educating the market about their technology. What can 3D printing do, and what can't it? What do you have to know about CAD files and their prep and conversion? What about equipment and production costs?
Learn all this and more in this informative EOS blog.


Uniquely durable and repeatable salt fog silver coating

Zygo Corp. has developed a salt fog silver coating that can be applied to silver reflector optics used either in harsh marine salt spray environments or for optics exposed to extreme temperatures. Salt fog silver is a silver mirror coating that offers high reflectivity from visible through to infrared wavelengths. A protective layer of salt fog silver is added to standard metallic silver coatings, ensuring that optics are better able to resist corrosion and mechanically induced damage. This product has been meticulously tested.
Learn more details.


Get full-spectrum 3D printing: Xometry PolyJet printing service

Xometry now offers full-spectrum 3D printing with their PolyJet printing service, thanks to the latest generation of PolyJet equipment from Stratasys. PolyJet technology is known for its high detail, smooth surface finish, and ability to simulate various material properties, such as rigidness or flexibility, in a single part. With over 600,000 available colors, Xometry can print full-color files submitted in 3MF format.
Learn more.


New technique to make foams could lead to lightweight, sustainable materials

By Brett Israel, Georgia Tech

At its most basic level, foam is a bunch of bubbles squished together. Liquid foams, a state of matter that arises from tiny gas bubbles dispersed in a liquid, are familiar in everyday life, from beer to bathwater. They also are important in commercial products and processes, including pharmaceutical formulation, oil production, food processing, cleaning products, cosmetics, or hair and skin care products. Lightweight dry foams for the construction of buildings, automobiles, and airplanes are key materials in the push for sustainability and energy efficiency. Making lightweight foam has one big challenge, however: keeping the foam stable.

A team of researchers from the Georgia Institute of Technology has developed a new type of foam -- called capillary foam -- that solves many of the problems faced by traditional foams. The new research shows for the first time that the combined presence of particles and a small amount of oil in water-based foams can lead to exceptional foam stability when neither the particles nor the oil can stabilize the foams alone.

Yi Zhang, a graduate student co-advised by Prof. Sven Behrens and Prof. Carson Meredith in the School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering at Georgia Tech, is shown holding a porous solid material prepared from a capillary foam. [Photo Credit: Gary Meek]

 

 

 

 

"It's very difficult to stabilize foams, and we want foams that are stable for months or years," said Sven Behrens, study co-author and professor in the School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering at Georgia Tech. "We've developed a way to make foams that is much easier and more broadly applicable that what is traditionally used."

The study was sponsored by the National Science Foundation (NSF). The research was published online October 3, 2014, in the journal Angewandte Chemie. The new capillary foams were developed by graduate student Yi Zhang, who is co-advised by Behrens and Carson Meredith, also a professor in the School of Chemical & Biomolecular Engineering.

The main ingredients for foam are air and water. Surfactants, which are similar to detergents, are then traditionally added to stabilize foams. Another traditional way to stabilize foam is to add microscopic particles, like talc powder. Both approaches require that the additive have a specific set of properties, which isn't always possible with the materials available.

The new study demonstrates how the addition of a tiny amount of oil allows the use of particles with more general properties.

"It sounds like we're making the system more complicated by adding oil to the mix, but it's a small amount of oil that could be something as simple as vegetable oil," Meredith said.

The new capillary foams expand the range of particles useful for stabilizing foams that are made of air and water. Air bubbles are stabilized by the combined action of the particles and the small amount of oil. This synergy of oil and particulate is counterintuitive because oils usually decrease foam stability and are commonly used as defoaming agents. But like the water-bridged grains of sand that hold a sand castle together, particles in the capillary foam form a stabilizing network connected by oil bridges.

"This is a novel phenomenon that people haven't discussed before, so we need to know more about why this works," Meredith said.

Lightweight dry foams made by this process could be used in many industries, from construction to automobile and airplane manufacturing.

"We're looking at several different application areas where it could be used as a product," Behrens said.

This research is supported by the Renewable Bioproducts Institute of Georgia Tech, by the National Science Foundation, and by the Air Force Office of Scientific Research. Any conclusions or opinions are those of the authors and do not necessarily represent the official views of the sponsoring agencies.

CITATION: Yi Zhang, et. al., "A new class of liquid foams stabilized by synergistic action of particles and immiscible liquid." (September 2014, Angewandte Chemie) http://dx.doi.org/10.1002/ange.201405816

Published October 2014

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